Pediatric stress fractures: a pictorial essay.

The femur is the largest and strongest bone in the body, so it takes tremendous force to cause a fracture. The most common cause of a fracture is direct trauma to the leg from an automobile accident or a fall. Supracondylar fractures are most common in patients who suffer from osteoporosis or have had total knee replacement surgery.

Simple supracondylar fractures are typically seen in younger children, and are uncommon in adults; 90% are seen in children younger than 10 years of age, with a peak age of 5-7 years 4,6. These fractures are more commonly seen in boys 4.


Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Femoral stress fractures can present with pain at the groin, hip, or knee, and are typically aggravated by activity. While the most common site of fracture is the femoral neck, fractures can occur anywhere along the femoral diaphysis (24).

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

A supracondylar humerus fracture is a fracture of the distal humerus just above the elbow joint. The fracture is usually transverse or oblique and above the medial and lateral condyles and epicondyles. This fracture pattern is relatively rare in adults, but is the most common type of elbow fracture in children.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Overview supracondylar fractures are one of the most common traumatic fractures see in children and most commonly occur in children 5-7 years of age from a fall on an outstretched hand treatment is usually closed reduction and percutanous pinning (CRPP), with the urgency depending on whether the hand remains perfused or not.

 

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Classification Femoral neck fractures are a subset of proximal femoral fractures. The femoral neck is the weakest part of the femur. Since disruption of blood supply to the femoral head is dependent on the type of fracture and causes significant morbidity, the diagnosis and classification of these fractures is important. There are three types.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Supracondylar fractures are the commonest fracture at the elbow in paediatric patients. They result from force applied across the elbow, usually following a fall. The supracondylar region is the weakest point in the developing elbow and therefore is commonly injured.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Supracondylar (SOO-pru-KON-dil-ar) femoral fracture (also called a distal (DIS-tuhl) fracture) is when the thigh bone, or femur, is broken at the knee. The knees are the largest weight weight-bearing joint in your body. The distal femur Forms the top part of the knee joint. The lower part of the knee joint is the shin bone, or tibia (TIH-bee-uh).

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Supracondylar Humerus Fractures Key Points: Common fracture treated by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons. Radiographic evaluation includes assessment of the anterior humeral line and Baumann’s angle. Gartland classification can be used to formulate treatment algorithm.

 

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Supracondylar humerus fractures (SHF) are very common types of elbow fractures in children between the ages of three and ten years1, 2. Totally displaced SHF may be related to neurovascular injuries, and treatment may be complicated by iatrogenic neurovascular injury, compartment syndrome, malunion, and elbow stiffness2, 3.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

Fractures of the distal femur are classified according to their anatomic location within the metaphysis or epiphysis (Figure 61-13). 198 The term supracondylar is reserved for metaphyseal fractures, whereas the terms condylar and intercondylar are used to describe epiphyseal fractures. 21,136,150,178,198 Although rare, bicondylar fractures occur, typically with simultaneous supracondylar.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

The treatment of supracondylar and intercondylar fractures of the femur challenges the orthopaedic surgeon. In the 1960s, Neer et al 12 advocated closed treatment over open reduction and internal fixation. That study concluded that the varus and internal rotation deformities in patients who were treated nonoperatively were preferable to complications from internal fixation, that is, Rush rods.

Supracondylar Fracture Femur Classification Essay

A spiral femur fracture simply indicates that the bone failed under torsional load. The bone structure of the femur is such that the bone is stronger under axial loading than torsional loading. These biomechanical properties of the femur lead to a lower injury threshold for torsional loading.

 


Pediatric stress fractures: a pictorial essay.

Neer developed the first classification for periprosthetic fractures in 1967. Neer classified 100 supracondylar distal femur fractures into three subtypes based on displacement and comminution. Lewis and Rorabeck further classified periprosthetic distal femur fractures into three subtypes in 1997.

Supracondylar fractures result from a fall on an outstretched arm in up to 70 percent of patients. The nondominant extremity is most commonly affected. Children under three years of age typically sustain a supracondylar fracture after a fall from a height of less than 3 feet (eg, fall from a bed or couch).

A femoral fracture is a bone fracture that involves the femur. They are typically sustained in high-impact trauma, such as car crashes, due to the large amount of force needed to break the bone. Fractures of the diaphysis, or middle of the femur, are managed differently from those at the head, neck, and trochanter (see hip fractures ).

The radial nerve lies posterolateral to the usual location of supracondylar fractures and, thus, is less commonly involved (see Fig. 15-1). The ulnar nerve with its posterior location is uncommonly involved with a typical extension-type supracondylar fracture. The forearm consists of two basic compartments: volar and dorsal. The volar.

Supracondylar fractures of the humerus have been recog-nised since the time of Hippocrates and are one of the more common fractures in children. Cheng1 reported it to be the second most common fracture in childhood (16.6%) and the most common before the age of seven. The fracture is a.

Keywords Avulsion fractures Casting and immobilization Child abuse non-accidental trauma (NAT) Distal humerus physeal separation Distal femur physeal fracture Pediatric hip dislocation Pediatric hip fracture Humeral shaft fractures Lateral condyle fracture Medial epicondyle fracture Pediatric ankle fractures Pediatric forearm fracture Pediatric clavicle fracture Pediatric distal radius.